Jessica Helfand, a founding editor of Design Observer, is an award-winning graphic designer and writer. A former contributing editor and columnist for Print, Eye and Communications Arts magazine, she is a member of Alliance Graphique Internationale and a recent laureate of the Art Director’s Hall of Fame. Jessica received both her BA and MFA from Yale University where she has taught since 1994. In 2013, she won the AIGA medal.










































































































































































































































































































11.27.06
How Hollywood Nailed The Half-Pipe
Pixar
and Animal Logic have mastered a particularly persuasive (and as it turns out, rather literal) form of spin that makes Road Runner look like dryer lint.







09.21.06
Death 'N' Stuff
Smoking Kills: The label days it all. Or does it? Once the allegedly chilling skull and crossbones is marketed as a decorative pattern
on a silk bowtie, its credibility as an mark of peril seems, well, somewhat questionable, begging the question: have we become so bored by life that we've inadvertently become inured to death?
































06.22.05
The Adventures of Cynic Boy and Design Mom in 3D
Brainwashed I may be, but I distinctly noted an homage to
Salvador Dalí — with perhaps a gentle nod to René Magritte — last night while sitting through Robert Rodriguez's ludicrous, yet oddly luscious new movie, The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl in 3D.




06.10.05
The Cut: When Life Imitates Art (I Mean Design)
CBS Television debuted its new series,
The Cut, (modeled after other reality shows such as NBC's The Apprentice)about "16 aspiring designers."







03.24.05
The Design Police
As unlikely as it sounds:  
Graphic Junkies is a photo blog by  "an active law enforcement officer in the state of Georgia." The photographs are remarkable; the context compelling.






02.18.05
My Friend Flickr
Flickr is a digital photo sharing website and web services suite that was developed by Ludicorp, a Vancouver, Canada company founded in 2002. It's a utopian oddity — a culture enabled by a technology that in turn enables a culture — and it's a brilliant example of socially networked software because it's free, its easy, and it makes sense.




02.16.05
The New Paper Chase: Cyberspace on The Auction Block
On February 23,
Christies in New York will auction more than 1,000 items dating as far back as the early 17th century, all of it tracing the history of cyberspace.















































Observed | June 14

The history of the 1940 Emeco 10-06 Navy Chair, made of bent aluminum, and strong enough to withstand an 8-story drop from a Chicago window. [BV]


Observed | June 13

Massimo Vignelli’s unused maps for the D.C. Metro are amazing. [BV]

A tale of two hats from Steven Heller. [BV]


Observed | June 12

About two years ago Brooklyn-based polymath Robby Kraft started using algorithmic code to design new origami patterns and they are astounding. [BV]

Herb Lubalin was born 100 years ago. To celebrate, join in to republish Herb Lubalin: American Graphic Designer (1918-81). [BV]


Observed | June 11

Super freaky recently declassified NSA security posters. Seriously. [BV]


Observed | June 07

Encyclopædia Britannica wants to fix false Google results with actual facts. [BV]


Observed | June 06

“Working with children, after all, was the rare field in which women’s gender was seen as an asset rather than an obstacle. As children gained their own spaces, their own toys, and their own diminutive furniture, beginning in the nineteenth century, refining, proselytizing, and testing designs meant for children was women’s work. We see their influence everywhere.” Alexandra Lange on the hidden women of architecture and design. [BV]


Observed | June 04

Lab100 is a new type of medical clinic that will use data science to predict and prevent medical conditions instead of diagnosing and treating issues after-the-fact. [BV]

What if your surroundings never went in the garbage? Taking recycling to the next level. [BV]

What New York can learn from Europe about designing a city for people instead of cars. [MB]


Observed | June 01

Jaron Lanier was there for the creation of the internet and is convinced that social media is toxic, making us sadder, angrier, and more isolated. [BV]


Observed | May 31

#TBT: The retro-futuristic movie posters of Laurent Durieux. [BV]


Observed | May 30

What happens when speculative design goes corporate?...At its most disturbing, it’s a way of giving a company’s employees permission to think the unthinkable—to grapple with how omniscient and powerful that corporate entity might become. [BV]

An explainer video from 1923—when films were still silent and the discovery of Pluto was 7 years in the future—about Einstein’s theory of relativity. [BV]


Observed | May 29

Arbys wants you to download their font, Saucy_AF, to “say it with sauce”. [BV]

It wasn’t until the 1990s that public libraries realized their most loyal patrons were teens—and started giving them room to act like teens. Alexandra Lange explores young adult architecture. [BV]


Observed | May 28

Meghan Markle has been granted her own coat of arms; its design was approved by the Queen. (via James I. Bowie) [BV]


Observed | May 24

“Design in this century has little use for anything that can’t be quantified. And yet, here is Apple’s App Store, presenting new, original illustrations several times a week.” [BV]


Observed | May 23

Bill Gold, the seminal designer who created posters for some of Hollywood‘s most famous movies—from A Streetcar Named Desire to The Exorcist—has died. [LS]

Pilot and photographer Christiaan van Heijst captures his stunning view of weather from the cockpit. [BV]

Goodbye Philip Roth, designer manqué. [BV]


Observed | May 22

Sadly we must say goodbye to Robert Indiana, who brought his world-famous LOVE sculpture to NYC in 1971. [BV]

Adherents to Design Thinking believe it will save higher ed. Are they delusional? [BV]

Adieu Interview. Almost 50 years after it was founded by Andy Warhol, the magazine is shutting down. [BV]


Observed | May 18

A Qin dynasty document from the third-century B.C.E, titled “The Volume of Crime Scene Investigation—Burglary,” pointed up fingerprints as a means of evincing whodunnit: The surprising history (and future) of fingerprints. [BV]


Observed | May 16

Glamour shots of chickens. [BV]

This Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center presents The Ark. [BV]


Observed | May 15

There’s very little advice or collective wisdom about how to properly end a creative project. (h/t Kottke.org) [BV]


Observed | May 14

Some afternoon eye candy: 1930s interior architecture illustrations. [BV]



Jobs | June 18